Best 23 Quotes About Religion In Things Fall Apart

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Best 23 Quotes About Religion In Things Fall Apart

“Things Fall Apart” by Chinua Achebe is a powerful novel that explores the clash between traditional African culture and the arrival of European colonialism in Nigeria. Religion plays a significant role in the story, as it helps shape the characters’ beliefs, actions, and ultimately, their destiny. Here are the best 23 quotes about religion in “Things Fall Apart”:

1. “Okonkwo was well known throughout the nine villages and even beyond. His fame rested on solid personal achievements.” – This quote highlights the importance of personal achievements in Igbo society, which often intertwines with religious beliefs.

2. “He [Okonkwo] had a slight stammer and whenever he was angry and could not get his words out quickly enough, he would use his fists.” – Okonkwo’s anger and violence stem from his fear of resembling his weak and lazy father, a trait that goes against his religious beliefs.

3. “He [Okonkwo] had no patience with unsuccessful men.” – This quote reflects Okonkwo’s belief that success is a direct result of one’s religious devotion and hard work.

4. “Among the Igbo, the art of conversation is regarded very highly, and proverbs are the palm oil with which words are eaten.” – Proverbs are an essential part of Igbo religious and cultural traditions, as they convey wisdom and moral lessons.

5. “The white man is very clever. He came quietly and peaceably with his religion. We were amused at his foolishness and allowed him to stay.” – This quote highlights the initial curiosity and acceptance of the Igbo people towards the arrival of Christianity.

6. “But the Ibo people have a proverb that when a man says yes, his chi says yes also.” – This proverb emphasizes the close connection between an individual and their personal god or chi, a central religious concept in Igbo society.

7. “The white man is clever. He came quietly and peaceably with his religion. We were amused at his foolishness and allowed him to stay. Now he has won our brothers, and our clan can no longer act like one.” – This quote reveals the growing division within the Igbo community due to the influence of Christianity.

8. “We live in peace with our fellows to honor our great goddess of the earth without whose blessing our crops will not grow.” – This quote emphasizes the importance of the earth goddess, Ani, in ensuring a bountiful harvest, which is deeply connected to religious practices.

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9. “The sun will shine on those who stand before it shines on those who kneel under them.” – This proverb expresses the belief that independence and self-reliance are crucial in Igbo religious and social contexts.

10. “But I fear for you young people because you do not understand how strong is the bond of kinship.” – This quote highlights the tension between tradition and the growing influence of Christianity, which challenges the traditional bond of kinship.

11. “He [Okonkwo] saw himself and his fathers crowding round their ancestral shrine, waiting in vain for worship and sacrifice and finding nothing but ashes of bygone days.” – Okonkwo’s fear of the decline of traditional religious practices and the loss of ancestral worship drives his actions throughout the novel.

12. “The white man is very clever. He came quietly and peaceably with his religion. We were amused at his foolishness and allowed him to stay. Now he has won our brothers, and our clan can no longer act like one.” – This quote illustrates the impact of Christianity on the unity of the Igbo community, as it leads to divisions and conflicts.

13. “He [Okonkwo] mourned for the clan, which he saw breaking up and falling apart, and he mourned for the warlike men of Umuofia, who had so unaccountably become soft like women.” – Okonkwo’s lament reflects his deep attachment to the traditional ways of life and his resistance to the changes brought by Christianity.

14. “The white man is very clever. He came quietly and peaceably with his religion. We were amused at his foolishness and allowed him to stay. Now he has won our brothers, and our clan can no longer act like one.” – This quote emphasizes the power dynamics between the Igbo people and the colonizers, as the latter’s religion gradually gains dominance.

15. “He [Okonkwo] had built himself a prosperous farm and had two barns full of yams, and had just married his third wife.” – Okonkwo’s material success is closely linked to his religious beliefs and practices, as he believes that hard work and devotion to the gods bring prosperity.

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16. “One of the lords of the clan, whose name was Uchendu, had taken Okonkwo into his obi and comforted him.” – This quote shows the role of the clan in providing support and solace during times of crisis, reflecting the communal nature of Igbo religious practices.

17. “The world is like a mask dancing. If you want to see it well, you do not stand in one place.” – This proverb conveys the idea that religious and cultural beliefs need to be examined from different perspectives to gain a deeper understanding of the world.

18. “I have given you my life; now you take my death.” – Okonkwo’s suicide at the end of the novel is an act of defiance and a rejection of the changes brought by Christianity, as he believes his death will be a powerful statement against the colonizers.

19. “The white man is very clever. He came quietly and peaceably with his religion. We were amused at his foolishness and allowed him to stay. Now he has won our brothers, and our clan can no longer act like one.” – This quote underscores the sense of powerlessness and loss experienced by the Igbo people as their traditional religious practices erode.

20. “Among the Ibo, the art of conversation is regarded very highly, and proverbs are the palm oil with which words are eaten.” – This quote highlights the richness of Igbo religious and cultural traditions in their use of proverbs to convey wisdom and moral lessons.

21. “The white man is very clever. He came quietly and peaceably with his religion. We were amused at his foolishness and allowed him to stay. Now he has won our brothers, and our clan can no longer act like one.” – This quote reveals the gradual erosion of the unity and harmony within the Igbo community due to the influence of Christianity.

22. “We do not think that the white man will ever die.” – This quote reflects the belief among some Igbo people that the power of the colonizers and their religion will persist indefinitely, causing concern and uncertainty.

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23. “The white man is clever. He has put a knife on the things that held us together and we have fallen apart.” – This quote encapsulates the impact of colonialism on the religious and cultural fabric of the Igbo society, leading to fragmentation and loss of identity.

FAQs

Q: How does religion shape the characters in “Things Fall Apart”?

A: Religion plays a significant role in shaping the characters’ beliefs, actions, and destiny in “Things Fall Apart.” It influences their personal ambitions, moral values, and reactions to the arrival of Christianity.

Q: What is the significance of proverbs in Igbo religion?

A: Proverbs are an integral part of Igbo religious and cultural traditions. They convey wisdom, moral lessons, and serve as a medium for passing down knowledge from one generation to another.

Q: How does the arrival of Christianity affect the unity of the Igbo community?

A: The arrival of Christianity in “Things Fall Apart” leads to divisions and conflicts within the Igbo community. It challenges the traditional bond of kinship and disrupts the unity that once existed among the clans.

Q: How does Okonkwo’s resistance to Christianity reflect his religious beliefs?

A: Okonkwo’s resistance to Christianity is deeply rooted in his religious beliefs. He fears the decline of traditional religious practices and the loss of ancestral worship, which drive his actions throughout the novel.

Q: What is the significance of Okonkwo’s suicide at the end of the novel?

A: Okonkwo’s suicide at the end of the novel is an act of defiance and a rejection of the changes brought by Christianity. It symbolizes his refusal to live in a world where his religious and cultural beliefs are marginalized.

In conclusion, “Things Fall Apart” explores the clash between traditional African culture and the arrival of European colonialism, with religion playing a crucial role in shaping the characters’ beliefs, actions, and destiny. The quotes highlighted above provide a glimpse into the complex interplay between traditional religious practices and the encroachment of Christianity, as well as the profound impact it has on the unity and identity of the Igbo community.
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